Storage Tips and Recipes: Fruit

Non-cherry stone fruits, avocados, tomatoes, mangoes, melons, apples, and pears will continue to ripen if left sitting out on a countertop. Items like grapes, all citrus, and berries will only deteriorate and should be refrigerated. Bananas in particular ripen very quickly, and will also speed the ripening of any nearby fruits.  Click on the fruits below for storage tips and recipes.

  • Apricots  Apricots

    Store on the counter until they ripen, then store in the refrigerator.

  • Avocados  Avocados

    Keep on counter, then refrigerate once they ripen and become soft. Tip: If the avocados you bought aren’t soft enough to eat yet, you can ripen them in a jiffy: Just throw them into a paper bag with a banana (bananas produce the most ripening-inducing ethylene of any fruit).

  • Bananas  Bananas

    Store on your counter, at room temperature. Ripe bananas can be frozen for baking or for making smoothies (the skins will blacken, but the flesh will be fine).

  • Blackberries  Blackberries

    Refrigerate in the fruit drawer, and only wash them right before using them. Discard damaged or moldy berries before storing to prevent the spread of mold.

  • Blueberries  Blueberries

    Refrigerate in the fruit drawer, and only wash them right before using them. Discard damaged or moldy berries before storing to prevent the spread of mold.

  • Cantaloupe  Cantaloupe Melon

    Store on your counter, at room temperature, and refrigerate when ripe. Before slicing the melon, wash the rind thoroughly to prevent the transmission of bacteria.

  • Cherries  Cherries

    Cold storage is key to keeping cherries fresh. Put your cherries in the fridge as soon as possible, preferably wrapped in a plastic bag. Wash them with cold water just before eating. Avoid washing prior to storage, as moisture can be absorbed where the stem meets the fruit and lead to splits or spoilage. Cherries can also be frozen. Pit them if you wish, or keep them whole with stems intact. Spread them in a single layer on a baking sheet, freeze until firm, and then place in a bag or container.

  • Charentais Melon  Charentais Melon

    Store on your counter, at room temperature, and refrigerate when ripe. Before slicing the melon, wash the rind thoroughly to prevent the transmission of bacteria.

  • Coconuts  Coconuts

    Store a whole coconut in the fridge for up to two months. Once opened, you can keep the coconut meat for several days only. If you decide to grate it, however, you can freeze it for 8 to 10 months.

  • Figs  Figs

    Figs are very delicate. Figs do not continue to ripen after being picked and are extremely fragile. If you think you will be eating your figs within a day, leave them on the counter. Refrigerate them to extend their shelf life, but always be sure they are spread out in a single layer to avoid molding.

  • Grapefruit  Grapefruit

    Store in a cool, dry place. Always refrigerate cut citrus.

  • Grapes  Grapes

    Should be stored in the refrigerator. If left out, will deteriorate quickly.

  • Guava  Guava

    Ripen guavas at room temperature until they give to gentle pressure. Then store ripe guavas immediately and use within 4 days.

  • Honeydew Melon  Honeydew Melon

    Store on your counter, at room temperature, and refrigerate when ripe. Before slicing the melon, wash the rind thoroughly to prevent the transmission of bacteria.

  • Kiwis  Kiwis

    Store at room temperature for several days or up to four weeks in refrigerator in your fruit bin. To eat, cut in half and scoop out with a spoon. A grapefruit spoon works well!

  • Kiwi Berries  Kiwi Berries

    Kiwi berries should be allowed to ripen at room temperature. When they are ready to be enjoyed, the berries will turn a dark green color and feel slightly soft to the touch. Unlike most fruits, they are not ready to eat until they look wrinkled and soft. Once they are ripe, store them in the refrigerator for up to two weeks or eat immediately. If they have been stored in your chill chest (the bottom drawer), let them come back up to room temperature before eating.

  • Lemons  Lemons

    Store in a cool, dry place. Always refrigerate cut citrus.

  • Limes  Limes

    Store in a cool, dry place. Always refrigerate cut citrus.

  • Lychee  Lychee

    Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator and eat within a week. Before eating, remove the stem and peel off the outer skin. and remember that the shiny brown seed in the middle is also inedible.

  • Mandarins  Mandarins

    Store in a cool, dry place. Always refrigerate cut citrus.

  • Mangos  Mangos

    Mangos: These will continue to ripen if left on countertop. Once they are ripe, they need to be refrigerated. It should be slightly soft and more yellow than green.

  • Nectarines  Nectarines

    Store on the counter until they ripen, then store in the refrigerator.

  • Oranges  Oranges

    Store in a cool, dry place. Always refrigerate cut citrus.

  • Papaya  Papaya

    Ripe papayas should be refrigerated to slow down the ripening process. Papayas will ripen within a few days at room temperature, and even faster if you put them in a paper bag. Once ripe, this fruit will quickly turn to mush if not properly stored. Place ripe, whole fruit in a plastic bag in the refrigerator, and it should last about a week.

  • Passion Fruit  Passion Fruit

    Ripe passion fruit is richly fragrant with wrinkled (but not dried) skin. If your passion fruit’s skin is still smooth, ripen it for a few days at room temperature, turning occasionally. Ripe passion fruit can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. If you have excess fruit, simply cut them in half, scoop out the pulp and freeze it for future use. Passion fruit works beautifully in sweet dishes of all persuasions. The pulp can be simply scooped over ice cream, rice pudding, yogurt or pound cake. It dresses up a fancy fruit salad or jazzes up a smoothie. Or try reducing the pulp over low heat to concentrate its flavor, then whisk in some extra-virgin olive oil to make a simple vinaigrette for greens or grilled fish.

  • Peaches  Peaches

    Store on the counter until they ripen, then store in the refrigerator.

  • Pears  Pears

    Store unripe pears on the counter. Once ripe, move them to the fruit drawer of your refrigerator. Tip: To check for ripeness, check the “neck” right next to the stem for a slight softness. If you want to speed up ripening, put pears in a paper bag.

  • Persimmon  Persimmon

    The Fuyru is the variety that we have in the Endlessly Organic box. It will ripen after picking and can stay on your counter. They will not get soft and can be eaten slightly underripe.

  • Pineapple  Pineapple

    Pineapple: A ripe pineapple will be firm but forgiving, with a sweet, pineapple like smell. Keep on the counter until ripe, then store in the refrigerator.

  • Plums  Plums

    Store on the counter until they ripen, then store in the refrigerator.

  • Pomegranates  Pomegranate

    Pomegranates will not ripen after picking. They should be kept in a cool, dark place such as in a paper bag in the refrigerator

  • Pomelo  Pomelo

    Store in a cool, dry place. Always refrigerate cut citrus.

  • Raspberries  Raspberries

    Refrigerate in the fruit drawer, and only wash them right before using them. Discard damaged or moldy berries before storing to prevent the spread of mold.

  • Starfruit  Starfruit

    Store in the refrigerator for up to two weeks. Cut across to form start shapes and eat up to the seeds. It does not need to be peeled.

  • Strawberries  Strawberries

    Refrigerate in the fruit drawer, and only wash them right before using them. Discard damaged or moldy berries before storing to prevent the spread of mold.

  • Tangerine  Tangerine

    Store in a cool, dry place. Always refrigerate cut citrus.

  • Tangelo  Tangelos

    Store in a cool, dry place. Always refrigerate cut citrus.

  • Watermelon  Watermelon

    Store on your counter, at room temperature, and refrigerate when ripe. Before slicing the melon, wash the rind thoroughly to prevent the transmission of bacteria.